Gutzyme Restore and Gutzyme Assist: Two Prime Digestive Enzymes

Gutzyme Restore and Gutzyme Assist: Two Prime Digestive Enzymes

Corganic offers two digestive enzymes that can be used in different circumstances to improve your digestive health. Gutzyme Restore is to help people with upper gut overgrowth digest their food better. Gutzyme Assist is to help different people with more broad digestive issues. Both enzymes are free of fillers like maltodextrin which can cause bloating and indigestion in people with gut overgrowth. The enzymes are also produced in the United States. I recommend both enzyme formulations and they can help improve your digestion when taken correctly.

Gutzyme Restore

Gutzyme Restore

Gutzyme Restore is a special formulated digestive enzyme to help people with upper gut overgrowth. The supplement contains 400 mg of betaine HCL and low amounts of pepsin to help increase stomach acid production and reduce stomach pH. We want our stomach pH to be around 1 to 2.5 to help facilitate proper digestion in the stomach and reduce bacterial overgrowth that prefer a higher stomach pH. Gutzyme Restore contains a great protease peptidase complex to digest protein and reduce protein fermentation in a poorly functioning upper gut. Many upper gut pathogens ferment protein as a source of fuel; if you have slow stomach emptying, large amounts of protein in your diet may uncomfortably bloat you. Gutzyme Restore may help people with GERD, upper gut overgrowth, gastroparesis, and H. pylori. The enzyme does contain lipase which may irritate people that are suffering from gastritis or ulcers, and the pepsin may react negatively in people with pepsin induced silent reflux. Other than those two caveats, if you are suffering from upper gut maldigestion this enzyme supplement may be for you. 1 2 3

Information About the Individual Enzymes Found in Gutzyme Restore:

  • Protease – A digestive enzyme that is useful in digesting protein. Look for a good digestive enzyme that includes a protease complex. 4
  • Amylase – A digestive enzyme that is produced by the saliva glands in humans, and in small amounts, produced by the pancreas. Amylase is a digestive enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of starches into simple sugars. If you are diabetic, you might want to use a digestive enzyme that has low amounts of amylase, or none at all. Amylase use in a diabetic might cause a major increase in blood glucose levels because of the rapid breakdown of starches into glucose in the stomach. 5
  • Lipase – A digestive enzyme that is useful in digesting fat. Look for a good digestive enzyme that includes different lipases. There are some concerns that long-term lipase supplementation may degrade the stomach lining in people with a weak lining or strong dysbiosis in the stomach. 6
  • Lactase – A digestive enzyme that breaks down lactose, a disaccharide sugar that is found in milk. Most people who are lactose intolerant, lack in the production of lactase; that is the source of their digestive issues when consuming dairy products. Supplementing with lactase when consuming those products might help prevent digestive issues. 7
  • DPP-IV Enzyme – A proteolytic/digestive enzyme that may degrade the immunodominant, proline-containing epitope of gliadin, the primary allergenic protein in gluten. In studies, DPP-IV has been shown to lessen or eliminate allergic reactions to gluten. Nevertheless, it should only be used for people sensitive to gluten or someone with Celiac disease when the source of the food might be contaminated with gluten. The enzyme should NEVER be used for people with gluten digestive issues to consume gluten because damage may still be done in the body, even when the enzyme is used.
  • Phytase – A digestive enzyme that is useful in digesting phytic acid. Many different vegetables, nuts, and carbohydrates contain phytic acid, which binds to some of the nutrients in our food causing us to be unable to break phytic acid down properly to assimilate the nutrients. It can help increase the nutrient potential in our food that has elevated phytic acid. 8
  • Pepsin – Pepsin is the main enzyme used by the stomach to digest protein. Pepsinogen activates and converts into the enzyme pepsin in the presence of stomach acid. Pepsin helps break down protein into amino acids the body can absorb and then becomes inactivated, by turning back into pepsinogen when it is mixed with bicarbonate released from the pancreas in the small intestine. This transformation protects the rest of the intestinal system from the pepsin and stomach acid. Pepsin should rarely be supplemented in people with silent reflux since it is the main cause of most of their issues. 9

Gutzyme Assist

Gutzyme Assist

Gutzyme Assist is more of a broad spectrum digestive enzyme that combines many different enzymes to help facilitate proper absorption and breakdown of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, and nutrients in our diet. The enzymes in Gutzyme Assist also help to break down more problematic proteins we ingest in our diet including gluten (wheat) and casein (most dairy products, A1 beta casein). Gutzyme Assist may help people who have lactose intolerance and people who get excessive gas formation from ingestion of complex carbohydrates like beans. If you are dealing with SIBO and you have seen a benefit with other digestive enzymes, I would recommend trying Gutzyme Assist and see if it helps reduce bloating and increases assimilation of the food and nutrients you consume to improve your digestive concerns. 10

Information About the Individual Enzymes Found in Gutzyme Assist:

  • Protease – A digestive enzyme that is useful in digesting protein. Look for a good digestive enzyme that includes a protease complex.
  • Amylase – A digestive enzyme that is produced by the saliva glands in humans, and in small amounts, produced by the pancreas. Amylase is a digestive enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of starches into simple sugars. You want a digestive enzyme that contains an amylase complex. If you are diabetic, you might want to use a digestive enzyme that has low amounts of amylase, or none at all. Amylase use in a diabetic might cause a major increase in blood glucose levels because of the rapid breakdown of starches into glucose in the stomach.
  • Lipase – A digestive enzyme that is useful in digesting fat. Look for a good digestive enzyme that includes different lipases. There are some concerns that long-term lipase supplementation may degrade the stomach lining in people with a weak lining or strong dysbiosis in the stomach.
  • Lactase – A digestive enzyme that breaks down lactose, a disaccharide sugar that is found in milk. Most people who are lactose intolerant, lack in the production of lactase; that is the source of their digestive issues when consuming dairy products. Supplementing with lactase when consuming those products might help prevent digestive issues.
  • Invertase – A digestive enzyme that breaks down inverted sugar. Inverted sugar is a combination of fructose and glucose. 11
  • DPP-IV Enzyme – A proteolytic/digestive enzyme that may degrade the immunodominant, proline-containing epitope of gliadin, the primary allergenic protein in gluten. In studies, DPP-IV has been shown to lessen or eliminate allergic reactions to gluten. Nevertheless, it should only be used for people sensitive to gluten or someone with Celiac disease when the source of the food might be contaminated with gluten. The enzyme should NEVER be used for people with gluten digestive issues to consume gluten because damage may still be done in the body, even when the enzyme is used.
  • Phytase – A digestive enzyme that is useful in digesting phytic acid. Many different vegetables, nuts, and carbohydrates contain phytic acid, which binds to some of the nutrients in our food causing us to be unable to break phytic acid down properly to assimilate the nutrients. It can help increase the nutrient potential in our food that has elevated phytic acid.
  • Beta-Glucanase – A digestive enzyme that breaks down beta-glucans, a polysaccharide. Beta-glucans are found in oats, cereal grains, and mushrooms. Beta-glucans might also occur as some part of the cell wall of fungi and bacteria. 12
  • Maltase – A digestive enzyme that breaks down the disaccharide maltose into glucose for energy. 13
  • Alpha-Galactosidase – A digestive enzyme that helps break down the polysaccharides and oligosaccharides for assimilation by our body and microbiome. 14

Conclusion

Digestive enzymes should be used in people who have problems breaking down and assimilating foods. They are extremely beneficial for people suffering from Celiac disease, gluten intolerance, lactose intolerance, people with bile issues, GERD, upper gut overgrowth, and people that are affected by SIBO. Digestive enzymes should be used sparingly, and during certain protocols, when needed. Digestive enzymes should not be utilized for an extended period. Long term use of digestive enzymes has been theorized to cause the body to make less digestive enzymes and can lead to a dependency. If you take them for an extremely long period, your digestive system might need a boost by taking Urban Moonshine ACV bitters (use with caution if you have histamine intolerance) to encourage endogenous production of enzymes again. This period where your digestive system produces fewer enzymes might cause some digestive problems to return. You should just try to wait it out if at all possible; eventually, your body will resume proper production of digestive enzymes. If you need to take digestive enzymes indefinitely, you should cycle off one week every month. During the off week, you should take Urban Moonshine ACV bitters every day.

I recommend both Gutzyme Restore and Gutzyme Assist from Corganic, two different digestive enzymes that can help many people with their digestive issues. Gutzyme Restore is to help people with upper gut overgrowth digest their food better. Gutzyme Assist is to assist many people with more widespread digestive problems. Both enzymes are produced in the United States and are free of fillers. Try them and let me know if they improve your digestion.

1 Comment
  1. There is a class of drugs for diabetes called DPP-IV inhibitors. If diabetics might want to inhibit DPP-IV, would taking a supplement that has extra DPP-IV be dangerous for diabetics?

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