Common Questions About Probiotic Supplementation – Part 1

Common Questions About Probiotic Supplementation - Part 1

I receive many questions about probiotics either through e-mail, on forums, and during coaching sessions.

I am going to start answering some of these questions on my blog so we both can have a better understanding of the complex issue of probiotic supplementation.

If you have any questions that you want to be answered in this series you can e-mail them to me here.

Question One

When is the best time to take a probiotic supplement?

The best time to take a probiotic supplement is a very complex question with multiple answers and depends individually on the person’s daily life and digestive health.

For most people, it is best to take the supplement when your stomach acid is very low, and your MMC is in its later stages. For most people, this is three to four hours after ingesting a meal. I believe it is best to consume a probiotic either right before bed with a small glass of filtered water OR when one first wakes up in the morning. If you choose to take a probiotic three to four hours after a meal or if you decide to take it when you first wake up in the morning you must wait a few hours before consuming food to allow the probiotic to make it into the large intestine.

When you take a probiotic, you want it to survive your stomach acid and make it eventually to the large intestine where the bacteria belong. If you take a capsule that is acid resistant, you can take your probiotic during a meal if you so choose, but the capsule can still dissolve which would not be optimal.

If you believe you suffered from MMC issues in the past, it is best to take the probiotic three to four hours after your meals or first thing in the morning and eat another meal after two hours. It is also best to ingest a prokinetic (cayenne, Swedish Bitters, or ginger) during the meal to help ensure proper delivery.

Why then do most manufacturers on the label state that they recommend you take a probiotic supplement with food? Supplementing probiotics without food may cause nausea for some people and taking the supplement with food can help alleviate that. If taking probiotics on an empty stomach make you feel nauseous, take it with food and make sure that the capsule is acid resistant.

So the choices you have when supplementing a probiotic are:

  1. When you first wake up in the morning. If you choose to do this, you need to eat two hours after supplementing.
  2. Three to four hours after a meal. You need to wait two hours to eat after ingesting probiotic.
  3. Supplement probiotic before bed with a glass of filtered water.
  4. Supplement acid resistant probiotic during a meal (only if supplementing a probiotic on an empty stomach makes you nauseous.)

Question Two

If I Am Suffering From Histamine Intolerance What Are Some Recommended Probiotic Supplements

There are many different probiotics that produce histamine and those that degrade histamine. If you are interested in the different strains and how they relate to histamine intolerance, I covered it more in depth here.

Here are some different probiotic supplements that should be tolerated in those with histamine issues:

3 Comments
  1. In your book, you reference that Saccharomyces boulardii is not recommended for those with histamine issues, but here it is recommended. Is this an error? Could you explain?

    Thank you

    • My book is more updated that my blog, it really depends on how strong your histamine issues are and Th2 elevation. I have updated the blog thank you.

      • Can you point to a study or reference that indicates why Saccharomyces boulardii is not recommended for those with histamine issues? I have not heard this anywhere else, and searches haven’t turned up anything.

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